The Last Gasp or Toadstools Mistaken for Mushrooms

Dublin Core

Title

The Last Gasp or Toadstools Mistaken for Mushrooms

Subject

Social satire, Medicine in art

Description

As in Molière’s comedic plays, Rowlandson’s The Last Gasp demonstrates the gullibility of people who depend on quacks. In the image, a toad-like man and his wife stick out their tongues for a physician who visits them in their finely appointed drawing room. The doctor and his apprentice mimic the grotesque expressions of the patients and stick out their tongues as well. The print proposes that the man’s indiscriminate appetite has led him and his wife to an appropriate fate that the doctor has no skills to prevent. But the mirroring figures also suggest there is no way to tell the practitioners of medicine apart from their patients: whether toadstools or mushrooms, all are equally foolish.

Creator

Thomas Rowlandson (1756-1827)

Source

[no text]

Publisher

Thomas Tegg, London

Date

1813

Contributor

Debra Cashion, in collaboration with Elisabeth Barrett, '15

Format

Hand-colored etching; original dimensions, 345 x 249 mm

Language

[no text]

Type

Still image

Identifier

[no text]

Coverage

[no text]

Files

Last Gasp (2).jpg

Collection

Citation

Thomas Rowlandson (1756-1827), “The Last Gasp or Toadstools Mistaken for Mushrooms,” The Anatomist: Early Modern Medical Satire, accessed November 23, 2017, http://anatomist.omeka.net/items/show/12.