The Reward of Cruelty

Dublin Core

Title

The Reward of Cruelty

Subject

Social satire, Medicine in art

Description

In the engraving entitled The Reward of Cruelty, the English artist William Hogarth (1697-1764), demonstrates the popular view of 18th century- medicine as a ghoulish occupation involving skeletons, cauldrons of boiling bones, and buckets of entrails thrown to the dogs. In Hogarth’s representation of an anatomy lecture, barber-surgeons seem to enjoy the work of carving up the body while pompously mortar-boarded physicians observe distractedly. Overhead the coat of arms of the King proclaims the imprimatur of the crown, also alluded to by the noose of the gallows that remains around the neck of the grimacing corpse of Tom Nero, who for his capital crimes suffers a fate considered even worse than death.

Creator

William Hogarth (1697-1764)

Source

from the series "The Four Stages of Cruelty"

Publisher

Hogarth, London

Date

1751

Contributor

Debra Cashion, in collaboration with Elisabeth Barrett, '15

Format

Engraving

Language

[no text]

Type

Still image

Identifier

[no text]

Coverage

[no text]

Files

Hogarth Cruelty Yale (2).jpg

Collection

Citation

William Hogarth (1697-1764), “The Reward of Cruelty,” The Anatomist: Early Modern Medical Satire, accessed November 23, 2017, http://anatomist.omeka.net/items/show/6.