The Enraged Son of Mars and Timid Tonsor

Dublin Core

Title

The Enraged Son of Mars and Timid Tonsor

Subject

Social satire, Medicine in art

Description

In The Enraged Son of Mars and Timid Tonsor, Rowlandson criticizes barber-surgeons who can barely offer a safe shave or haircut but claim to have enough skills to treat the sick and injured. The angry customer, a military officer who has removed his sword and hat, reacts angrily to having his face cut while being shaved. On a shelf above the sword and hat is a row of wigs labled for clients of different professions: 'Clarkes Block', 'Parsons Block', 'Docter's Block', 'Lawyers Block.' On the rear wall a small illustration depicts King David’s handsome but arrogant son Absolom, who was killed in battle when caught in a tree by his long hair. The monkey sitting on the table lathering his own head demonstrates that he can easily do the same job as any barber.

Creator

Thomas Rowlandson (1756-1827)

Source

[no text]

Publisher

Thomas Tegg, London

Date

1811

Contributor

Debra Cashion, in collaboration with Elisabeth Barrett, '15

Format

Hand-colored etching; original dimensions, 248 x 345 mm

Language

[no text]

Type

Still image

Identifier

[no text]

Coverage

[no text]

Files

Enraged Son of Mars (2).jpg

Citation

Thomas Rowlandson (1756-1827), “ The Enraged Son of Mars and Timid Tonsor,” The Anatomist: Early Modern Medical Satire, accessed November 23, 2017, http://anatomist.omeka.net/items/show/3.