The English Dance of Death, illustrations by Thomas Rowlandson,

Dublin Core

Title

The English Dance of Death, illustrations by Thomas Rowlandson,

Subject

Social satire, Medicine in art

Description

In The English Dance of Death Rowlandson applies his morbid sense of humor to a narrative poem by William Combe. The Quack Doctor depicts a busy apothecary mixing medicine for a line of anxious patients, while a man with gout, perhaps a regular customer, waits in a chair. Over his shoulder the man sees Death, who works a mortar and pestle labeled "Slow Poison" while watching for new clients in a mirror. The apothecary, however, assures that “These curious Panaceas will / If well applied cure every ill.” The fish hanging from the ceiling, which no one seems to notice, identifies him as an untrustworthy merchant whose goods “stink” like an old fish.

Creator

William Combe (1742–1823) and Thomas Rowlandson (1756-1827)

Source

from The English Dance of Death

Publisher

D. Appleton, New York

Date

1903

Contributor

Debra Cashion, in collaboration with Elisabeth Barrett, '15

Format

Printed book on paper

Language

[no text]

Type

Text

Identifier

[no text]

Coverage

[no text]

Files

Quack Doctor.jpg

Collection

Citation

William Combe (1742–1823) and Thomas Rowlandson (1756-1827), “The English Dance of Death, illustrations by Thomas Rowlandson,,” The Anatomist: Early Modern Medical Satire, accessed September 21, 2017, http://anatomist.omeka.net/items/show/28.