The Anatomist, or Sham Doctor (1762)

Dublin Core

Title

The Anatomist, or Sham Doctor (1762)

Subject

Social satire, Medicine in art

Description

French theatre had a direct influence on English drama during the English Interregnum (1649-1660), when the theatres in England were closed by the Puritans and much of the English aristocracy lived in exile in France. Ravenscroft’s hilarious farce represents a typical work of Restoration Comedy, developed during the period of 1660-1710, when not only the English monarchy but the English stage was happily back in business. The inspiration for Ravenscroft’s The Anatomist was a French play, Crespin médicin, written by Noël Lebreton de Hauteroche (1617-1707), a contemporary of Molière. In this one-act version the debt to French theatre is especially apparent: the role of the doctor, “Monsieur le médicin,” is a difficult read, written with a French accent.

Creator

Edward Ravenscroft (c.1654–1707)

Source

[no text]

Publisher

T. Davies, London

Date

1762

Contributor

Debra Cashion, in collaboration with Elisabeth Barrett, '15

Format

Printed book on paper

Language

English

Type

Text

Identifier

[no text]

Coverage

[no text]

Files

Ravenscroft 1762_7_8 (2).jpg

Collection

Citation

Edward Ravenscroft (c.1654–1707), “The Anatomist, or Sham Doctor (1762),” The Anatomist: Early Modern Medical Satire, accessed September 21, 2017, http://anatomist.omeka.net/items/show/22.