Comedy in the Country, Tragedy in London

Dublin Core

Title

Comedy in the Country, Tragedy in London

Subject

Social satire, Medicine in art

Description

In contrast to the opposite work about audience, this print illustrates attendance at non-patent or “illegitimate” theatres, one in London and one in the countryside. Non-patented theatres in England were theoretically illegal, so they usually included programs of music to disguise their productions as concerts instead of plays. The boisterous crowd from the country enjoys a raucous musical performance in a rustic space. The city crowd appears more urbane, but a barrier of spikes has been installed to protect the musicians and actors from the emotional and unpredictable crowd. A woman near the center wears a tri-color bonnet, perhaps a symbol of the 1791 Chapelier Law, which encouraged free-market theatre in France.

Creator

Thomas Rowlandson (1756-1827)

Source

[no text]

Publisher

Thomas Tegg, London

Date

1807

Contributor

Debra Cashion, in collaboration with Elisabeth Barrett, '15

Format

Hand-colored etching; original dimensions, 347 x 246 mm

Language

[no text]

Type

Still image

Identifier

[no text]

Coverage

[no text]

Files

BM_Spectators_2.jpg

Collection

Citation

Thomas Rowlandson (1756-1827) , “Comedy in the Country, Tragedy in London,” The Anatomist: Early Modern Medical Satire, accessed November 23, 2017, http://anatomist.omeka.net/items/show/20.