A Visit to the Doctor

Dublin Core

Title

A Visit to the Doctor

Subject

Social satire, Medicine in art

Description

A Visit to the Doctor describes an appointment with a physician who could have belonged to Hogarth’s Company of Undertakers. He lives the lifestyle of a nobleman and receives patients in a well-appointed study attended by a footman. The bust of Galen on the mantel and the elegant bookcase suggest he is overly-learned and out of touch with reality. The patients are simple folks who have been led to believe they should seek his advice. Although he should send these healthy people away, the doctor sees an opportunity for a fee: “You eat well—you drink well and you sleep well—very good— You was perfectly right in coming to me, for depend upon it I will give you something that shall do away all these things.”

Creator

Thomas Rowlandson (1756-1827)

Source

[no text]

Publisher

Thomas Tegg, London

Date

1809

Contributor

[no text]

Format

Hand-colored etching; original dimensions, 234 x 329 mm

Language

[no text]

Type

Still image

Identifier

[no text]

Coverage

[no text]

Files

Visit to the Doctor (2).jpg

Collection

Citation

Thomas Rowlandson (1756-1827), “A Visit to the Doctor,” The Anatomist: Early Modern Medical Satire, accessed November 23, 2017, http://anatomist.omeka.net/items/show/15.