The Company of Undertakers

Dublin Core

Title

The Company of Undertakers

Subject

Social satire, Medicine in art

Description

In The Company of Undertakers, Hogarth parodies the theme of medicine as a “noble” profession by creating a phony coat of arms emblazoned with the heads of physicians, all holding to their noses an attribute of their profession, a cane filled at the end with a medicinal sachet to cleanse foul vapors in the air. Using the official parlance of British heraldry, the caption describes the shield as “Beareth sable, an Urinal proper, between 12 Quack-Heads of the second and 12 Cane Heads Or, Consultant.” The title of the print is a deliberate misnomer, reinforced by the crossbones near the bottom and the motto, “Et plurima mortis imago,” or “and most an image of death.”

Creator

William Hogarth (1697-1764)

Source

[no text]

Publisher

Hogarth, London

Date

1736

Contributor

Debra Cashion, in collaboration with Elisabeth Barrett, '15

Format

Etching, engraving; original dimensions, 258 x 178 mm

Language

[no text]

Type

Still image

Identifier

[no text]

Coverage

[no text]

Files

Hogarth Undertakers_crop.jpg

Collection

Citation

William Hogarth (1697-1764), “The Company of Undertakers,” The Anatomist: Early Modern Medical Satire, accessed November 23, 2017, http://anatomist.omeka.net/items/show/14.